Home
About Us
Contact Us
Support Us

Charity Number: SC 042728

The Royal Regiment of Scotland

The Royal Regiment of Scotland was formed on the 28th March 2006, as part of the British Army's restructuring for future operations. The existing six regular infantry regiments were formed into one regiment, with the Royal Scots and the King’s Own Scottish Borderers being merged to form the Royal Scots Borderers. The resultant five regiments become a separate battalion of the new regiment, each being numbered in order of precedence. The oldest formed regiment becoming the 1st Battalion, while the most recently formed one becoming the 5th Battalion.

The Royal Scots Borderers, 1st Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (1 SCOTS) is based at Dreghorn Barracks in Edinburgh.

Royal Colonel – HRH The Princess Royal
Deployments
Belize , April/May 2007
Iraq , Nov. 2007 early summer 2008
Afghanistan , March 2010
Role – Light Infantry battalion
Hackle – Black
Regimental Days – Minden Day, 1st August

Royal Scots Day, 28th March
Battalion Marches
Quick March – Blue Bonnets o’er the Border
Slow March – Garb of Old Gaul

Museums
The Royal Scots Museum , Edinburgh Castle
The King’s Own Scottish Borderers Museum

The Barracks
Berwick-upon-Tweed

The Royal Highland Fusiliers, 2nd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (2 SCOTS) is based at Glencorse Barracks, Penicuik, just outside Edinburgh.

2 SCOTS Tam O'Shanter bonnet
2 SCOTS Tam O'Shanter bonnet

 

 

 

Adjutant General's Corps attached to 2 SCOTS

Adjutant General's Corps attached to 2 SCOTS

 

 



Royal Colonel – HRH The Prince Andrew
Deployments – Afghanistan, April – September 2009
Role – Light Infantry battalion
Hackle – White
Regimental Days – Assaye Day, 23rd September
Inkerman Day, 5th November

Battalion Marches
Quick March – Highland Laddie
Slow March – My Home

Museum
The Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum,
518 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow

The Black Watch, 3rd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (3 SCOTS) is based at Fort George just outside Inverness.

3 scots piper

3 SCOTS Piper

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royal Colonel – HRH The Duke of Rothesay
Deployments – Falklands, December 2007, Kenya , six weeks training, 2008, Afghanistan , April – September 2008, Afghanistan , November 2011 – April 2012
Role – Light Infantry battalion
Hackle – Red
Regimental Days – Red Hackle Day, 5th January
Ticonderoga Day, 8th July

Battalion Marches
Quick March – Highland Laddie
Slow March – Skye Boat Song

Museum
The Black Watch Museum, Balhousie Castle, Perth

The Highlanders, 4th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (4 SCOTS) is based at Fallingbostel in Germany.

The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 5th Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland (5 SCOTS) is basedat Howe Barracks in Canterbury.

royal regiment of scotland

The All Ranks cap badge
This badge consists of a bright silver Saltire, upon which is mounted a Lion Rampant in a dull gilt finish. Below this is the regimentalmotto NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT (No one molests me with impunity) on a three piece scroll. A seperate Crown of Scotland (as housed in Edinburgh Castle ) in a dull gilt finish, sits above the Lion Rampant and the upper arms of the Saltire.

 

other rank badges

The Other Ranks collar badges
These are made with a bright electro gilt finish. The thistles, which face outwards, were previously worn by the Royal Scots, with ROYAL SCOTS on the scroll. The motto CUIDICH’N RIGH, meaning ‘Help to the king’ was previously worn on the scroll below the cap badge of the Seaforth Highlanders and subsequently that of the Queen’s Own Highlanders and The Highlanders. Early manufactured ORs collar badges were made with a single lug and held in place with a backing plate and pin. Thesewere superseded with new production made with two pins held in place with clutch fasteners. The fastenings were changed so that they wouldn’t damage the collars of the newly introduced FAD (Future Army Dress) No.2 Dress uniforms, worn by All Ranks.

officers collar badgesOfficers collar badges
Officers wear similar collar badges but with a bronze finish. All of these appear to have been made with two pins held in place with clutch fasteners.

buglers blog
The Royal Regiment of Scotland SoldiersHandbook
The Royal Regiment of Scotland Regimental Magazine
The Royal Regiment of Scotland Regimental Reels Guide
Bookmark and Share